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Did You Know…

11 LSU Health Shreveport Health Science Librarians are members of the South Centeral Chapter of the Medical Library Association. This organization allows medical librarians from Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and New Mexico to connect and learn from one another. To learn more, see the organization’s website: http://www.sccmla.org.

The History Corner

Mayo Drake's Legacy

Mr. Drake was a respected and integral member of not only the founding faculty of the School of Medicine in Shreveport, but also the medical library profession.

To read more about this issue's history feature, check out the November, 2016 – Issue 31 section of The History Corner page

The History Corner

 

November, 2016 – Issue 31

 

Mayo Drake’s Legacy

Mayo Drake was appointed Head of the Department of Medical Library Science in 1967. After ten years of experience at the University of Florida Health Sciences Center in Gainesville, he was assigned the daunting task of starting an academic library for a new medical school scheduled to open in 1969. With the assistance of just one other professional librarian and three staff members, Mr. Drake had less than two years to design the library space, as well as acquire and catalog thousands of books and hundreds of journals. When the medical school building was finally constructed, Mr. Drake was appointed as Chair of the Dedication Ceremony Committee and was responsible for organizing this important event to celebrate the establishment of the School of Medicine in Shreveport.

Mr. Drake was also actively involved in professional organizations and led the movement to officially incorporate Louisiana as part of the South Central Chapter of the Medical Library Association. In 1989, the chapter members honored Drake by renaming the student scholarship after him. Mr. Drake was a respected and integral member of not only the founding faculty of the School of Medicine in Shreveport, but also the medical library profession.

July, 2016 – Issue 30

 

Local Media Delivers Consumer Health Information in 1930

Physicians associated with Shreveport Charity Hospital presented consumer health radio programs on local station KWKH at 7:15 each morning from the Hospital’s studio. The station was owned by William Kennon Henderson, who named the station with his initials. As a generous Hospital Board member, he allowed Shreveport Charity Hospital to broadcast the shows for free. Henderson was not only an influential local businessman, but he was also nationally recognized for his radio broadcasts.

 

April, 2016 – Issue 29

 

Miss Dora Williams

University Health began as Shreveport Charity Hospital in 1876. Twenty-two years after opening, the hospital hired its first professionally trained nurse, Miss Dora Williams. She was a member of the third graduating class of nurses at the New Orleans Charity Hospital. In December 1898, Miss Williams was hired as the head nurse at the Shreveport Charity Hospital, and she was described as a “very efficient trained nurse.” As head nurse, Miss Williams received a salary of $30 per month. After 15 months in this position, she requested a raise to $50 per month. Instead of agreeing to her request, she was replaced by another nurse who was paid $40 per month. Miss Williams then served as a private duty nurse, the first such nurse in the city of Shreveport.

 

January, 2016 – Issue 28

 

Hippocrates Tree Planted

On December 1, 1976, Dr. Ike Muslow, Dean of the School of Medicine, and Dr. George Meneely, Associate Dean, planted the Hippocrates tree on campus. The tree was taken from a grove of sycamores on the island of Cos, where Hippocrates taught medicine. Dr. Thomas Doxiades of Athens, Greece, a long-time personal friend of Dr. Meneely, gave the tree as a gift to the newly established School of Medicine. Unfortunately, the tree did not survive, but Dr. Robert Clawson saved a seed pod, which is now in the Library Archives.

 

November, 2015 – Issue 27

 

LSU Health Shreveport Celebrates 40th Anniversary

ribbon cutting

On October 28, 2015, LSU Health Shreveport celebrated its 40th Anniversary. Forty years ago on October 28, 1975, a ribbon cutting ceremony was held to commemorate the completion of the medical school building. However, our history actually begins twenty-five years prior to this event, when local physicians began lobbying for a School of Medicine in Shreveport in 1950. After these initial efforts were blocked by Governor Earl K. Long, the physicians proposed a Postgraduate School of Medicine five years later, but in 1958, Long was governor again and thwarted these plans, as well.

Then, in 1963, these physicians rallied together again, and by 1965, they had convinced Governor John J. McKeithen to sign the bill that officially established the School of Medicine in Shreveport. Even though they were not given any funding, they worked without compensation to open the medical school. When construction was delayed, the physicians partnered with the V. A. Hospital, so that the first medical school students could enroll as scheduled in 1969.

Finally, after three classes had already graduated, the medical school building opened its doors in 1975. This event not only signified a new era in medical education in north Louisiana, but also represented a monumental achievement for the local physicians and citizens who worked tirelessly for twenty-five years to establish the School of Medicine.

 

September, 2015 – Issue 26

 

Featured Item from the Library Archives: Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup Medicine Bottle

bottle

This patent medicine came onto the market in 1849 as a pain-relieving aid for teething babies. The drug contained one gram of morphine per fluid ounce, and many infants given the medicine suffered malnutrition, became addicted, or overdosed. When the Food and Drug Act was established in 1906, the drug was banned for sale in the United States.

 

July, 2015 – Issue 25

 

Renaissance Science & Medicine: A History Lesson from Harry Potter’s World

History of Medicine Exhibit 2015

NLM Exhibit: Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine

 

Believe it or not, J. K. Rowling based the magic in the Harry Potter stories on actual scientific knowledge from the Renaissance period, making her magical world of witches and wizards not just imaginative fun, but also a lesson in the history of medicine. The Health Sciences Library is hosting the traveling exhibit, Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine, developed by the National Library of Medicine. Also, LSU Health Shreveport librarians have created a complementary display, From Magic to Medicine, to showcase interesting books and artifacts from the Library’s History of Medicine collections that are related to the theme. The exhibition will be on display until August 15.

 

April, 2015 – Issue 24

 

Be Careful when Crossing the Street

Hardin and Clarkson and the Hardin-Clarkson subway

Hardin and Clarkson and the Hardin-Clarkson subway

 

Have you ever dodged dangerous traffic while crossing Kings Highway to get to the restaurants or Eye Clinic? Believe it or not, the traffic surrounding our institution has always been dangerous, even when the hospital was located at the corner of Texas Avenue and Murphy Street in the 1930s.

On Christmas Eve in 1931, nursing students Ms. Hardin and Ms. Clarkson left their dormitory and began to cross Murphy Street to get to the Shreveport Charity Hospital. Suddenly, a reckless driver struck the students but did not even stop to help them. Although the students were badly injured, they survived the accident. However, the driver was never apprehended.

To prevent future accidents and protect the nursing students, an underground subway was built connecting the Nurses’ Home to the Charity Hospital. It was aptly named the Hardin-Clarkson Subway, in honor of the lives almost lost.

 

December, 2014 – Issue 23

 

LSU Health Celebrates Founders’ Day

history corner

On October 29, 2014, LSU Health Shreveport celebrated 39 years since the original groundbreaking of the medical school building in 1975. In 1982, the school graduated its 10th class in its own building. This year marked the first Founders’ Day to celebrate this momentous occasion, which didn’t come easily. After 25 years of unsuccessful lobbying to get a medical school established in Shreveport, the medical school’s founders finally gained support from Senator Jay Bennett Johnston, Jr. and Governor McKeithen.

 

This interview with Deidra Woodson from the Health Sciences Library elaborates on the struggles endured by the medical school to be recognized by the state. Here, also, is a message from Chancellor Barish on the occasion. To read more about the history of LSU Health Shreveport, be sure to check out the LSUHSC History website.

Contact: dwood6@lsuhsc.edu

 

September, 2014 – Issue 22

 

A Day of Registration and Orientation for Medical Students

The 32-members of the first freshman medical school class of the LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport completed forms, received physical examinations, paid tuition, bought books, and posed for photographs on the very busy day of September 12, 1969. The LSU School of Medicine was the 100th medical school founded in the United States and would be home for the next four years to the 31 men and 1 woman of this first class. The medical students began their first day of class a few days later on September 15th.

 

July, 2014 – Issue 21

 

Remembering Mrs. Virginia Lash

Mrs. Virginia Lash

Mrs. Virginia Lash

Mrs. Virginia Lash was a librarian on our staff from the school’s beginning in 1969 until her retirement in September 1989. She passed away on May 27, at the age of 93. The Library received a generous donation from former Library Director Marianne Comegys in Mrs. Lash’s memory. We have used the donated funds to purchase access to the electronic version of the book Fast Facts about EKGs for Nurses: The Rules of identifying EKGs in a Nutshell.

You can provide a lasting tribute to a family member, friend, or colleague by making a monetary contribution to the Health Sciences Library for the purchase of a Library resource. For more information, please contact Betty Tucker at 675.5457 or btucke@lsuhsc.edu.

 

April, 2014 – Issue 20

 

Remembering Dr. Wilson

 

Dr. Woody Wilson, Clinical Professor of Medicine, passed away on January 28. Dr. Wilson completed his residency training at Confederate Memorial Hospital from 1953 to 1956. He joined the faculty in 1967 and became deputy department head for volunteer faculty in 1989. He moved to gratis faculty status in 2001. As historian of the Shreveport Medical Society, he frequently provided books on the history of medicine for our collection. Dr. Wilson was the driving force behind the fundraising for the construction of the Library’s History of Medicine Room.

Pictured from left to right: Dr. J. Woody Wilson, Jr., Dr. Charles Knight, Marianne Comegys, and Dr. Gordon Mead.

Pictured from left to right: Dr. J. Woody Wilson, Jr., Dr. Charles Knight, Marianne Comegys, and Dr. Gordon Mead.

The Library received a generous donation in Dr. Wilson’s memory from former Library Director Marianne Comegys. To honor Dr. Wilson and remember his passion for the study of medical history, we have used the donated funds to purchase access to the electronic version of these books:

 

January, 2014 – Issue 19

Pants Approved This Month in 1971

nurse's uniformIn the fall of 1970, two nurses were reprimanded for wearing pants to work. By this time, the School of Medicine had already approved pantsuits for female employees, but the hospital would not allow them until January 21, 1971, when the hospital director Dr. Edgar Galloway sent a memo to department heads and all hospital personnel that finally sanctioned pantsuits. The memo also established standards and policies that specified colors, styles, and fabrics allowed.

Colors:
Registered and Practical Nurses: White
Registered Dieticians and Food Service Supervisors: White
Nursing Service Aides: Grey
Food Service Workers: Aqua
Housekeeping Employees: Blue

Style:
Two-piece uniform with tailored lines
Tunic top: approximately finger tip length
Pants: shoe top length with straight or very slightly flared
No stretch pants or pants with bell bottoms or tapered styles

Fabric:
Sufficient weight so that under garments are not visible
Washable

 

November, 2013 – Issue 18

LSU Health Health Sciences Library – The Early Years

The history of the LSU Health Shreveport Health Sciences Library is entwined with the foundation and development of the School of Medicine in Shreveport. Proponents of a school of medicine in Shreveport had their first victory on June 7, 1965, when Governor John J. McKeithen signed the legislative bill establishing a branch of the Louisiana State University School of Medicine in Shreveport, although no funding was provided for its construction or operation. After months of lobbying, a funding bill that provided for a $10 million bond issue to fund the state’s share of the medical school’s construction costs was successfully passed. The state’s $10 million was to be matched by a $20 million Joint Construction Grant from the United States Public Health Service, an agency of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, for a total of $30 million.

 

A contract to begin development of the 12-story, 450,000 square foot Medical School building in Shreveport was signed in March 1967. The Medical Library was an important component of the School and was to occupy 28,000 square feet at the south end of the building, on the ground and first floor. The library space would hold close to 100,000 volumes, while also providing carrels and study space for 300 persons.

 

The medical school building would hopefully become a reality in the near future, but not in time to provide facilities for the first class of medical students. A 1967 agreement between the Veterans Administration Hospital in Shreveport and the LSU School of Medicine provided the framework that allowed the VA Hospital to serve as the temporary home for the 32 members of the freshman class who began their studies in September 1969.

 

Mayo Drake, Professor and Head of the Department of Medical Library Science

Mayo Drake, Professor and Head of the Department of Medical Library Science

Extensive renovations at the VA Hospital provided classrooms, laboratories, administrative offices and space for a Medical Library. In late 1967, Mayo Drake had been selected to serve as Professor and Head of the Department of Medical Library Science. He was instrumental in the planning and evolution of the Library. By July 1968, the Library’s temporary home consisted of 4,500 square feet of dedicated space in the basement of the Hospital, with seating for 36 users. Mr. Drake was assisted by an associate librarian and three non-professional staff. Library holdings included 25,000 volumes, with subscriptions to 575 journals. The library had an annual budget of $69,225 to fund both personnel and materials.

 

Temporary Medical Library at the Veterans Administration Hospital, circa 1969

Temporary Medical Library at the Veterans Administration Hospital, circa 1969

In November 1967 an application to request federal assistance for the medical school construction was submitted. Unfortunately, a site visit conducted one month later resulted in a negative decision. The Medical School administrators were advised to resubmit the application, which they did in July 1969. Six months later it was announced that the School of Medicine in Shreveport would receive $20,288,242 in federal funding.

 

Medical Library in the School of Medicine, circa 1975

Medical Library in the School of Medicine, circa 1975

Groundbreaking ceremonies on September 16, 1971 marked the start of construction for the School, located on the grounds of the Confederate Memorial Medical Center, between the hospital and the nursing student residence. On October 28, 1975 – four years, one month and eleven days after groundbreaking – the dedication of the $30.8 million complex that would house the LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport was held. Faculty, staff and students pitched-in to move equipment, supplies, furniture and other essentials into the new facilities. With this move, the medical school offices and staff, as well as classes and instructors, were brought together for the first time under a single roof.

 

September, 2013 – Issue 17

1501 KINGS HIGHWAY – A HISTORY

Confederate Memorial Medical Center in 1953

Confederate Memorial Medical Center in 1953

 

Now that the future of the LSU Hospital on Kings Highway has been decided, a look back at its history at this location is in order. Established in 1876, the Shreveport Charity Hospital was located in downtown Shreveport, first at Pierre Avenue and Ford Street, and later at Texas Avenue and Murphy Street. Chronically underfunded, the Hospital was beyond renovation. A 1941 hospital assessment paved the way for construction of a new facility. Various bond issues and bills were proposed in the Louisiana Legislature. Finally, in 1946, a constitutional amendment that authorized the issuance of bonds to be secured by surpluses from the Confederate Veterans’ pension fund tax was approved. A twenty-three acre plot of land was purchased at the southeast corner of Kings Highway and Linwood Avenue. This location had previously been occupied by “Curraghmuir,” the James M. Foster family estate, built in 1870.

Associated Hospital Architects, composed of the Shreveport firms of Samuel G. Wiener, Neild and Somdal, and Van Os and Flaxman, was chosen to design the building. The $6,039,000 bid from the J.A. Jones Construction Company was accepted in July 1949 and led to the second largest building permit ever issued in Shreveport. The long-awaited groundbreaking for the new hospital facility took place on September 5, 1949. Nearly four years later, on June 3, 1953, the new hospital was dedicated and even received a new name – Confederate Memorial Medical Center – derived from the major source of its funding, the Confederate Veterans’ pension fund tax.  Now, sixty years later, a new chapter in the hospital’s history is being written.

 

June, 2013 – Issue 16

LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport Created

history of medicine

On June 7, 1965 at 4:30 p.m., Governor John J. McKeithen signed Bill 47 into law as Act 2 of 1965. This Act established a branch of the Louisiana State University School of Medicine in Shreveport. Although the medical school had been created, no funding was provided for its construction or operation. One Representative said, “Give them their medical school on paper, and they won’t be back, and that is all we will hear about it.” History, it would appear, proved this Representative wrong.

 

March, 2013 – Issue 15

First Cancer Treatment Center in Louisiana

The O.K. Allen Tumor Clinic, situated in the Shreveport Charity Hospital (former name of LSU Health Shreveport), was the first cancer clinic in Louisiana. The Clinic, named in honor of incumbent Louisiana Governor O.K. Allen, was established on July 2, 1932 under the auspices of the American College of Surgeons. The need for a cancer clinic was prompted by the increasing incidence of the disease. In the 1920s, cancer was the eighth leading cause of death and just ten years later was ranked second.  Even after eight decades of research, this formidable disease remains the second leading cause of death.

Click here for statistics from the first two years of the Clinic’s operation showing the type of cancer, condition when admitted, treatment, and final outcome.

January, 2013 – Issue 14

 

LSU Health Shreveport – A Different Name for  a Different Century

The third Shreveport Charity Hospital building was completed at a cost of $79,815 and opened its doors on June 1, 1904. The building was designed by architect Thomas Sully of New Orleans, and A. Skoog served as the contractor. Dr. Randell Hunt served as chief surgeon, and Dr. W.M. Ledbetter was assistant surgeon and superintendent. The new hospital housed 180 patients in six furnished wards. The modern three-story building contained an elevator, screened windows, and a telephone. The Hospital remained at this location until 1953 when the facility was moved to its current location on Kings Highway.

LSU Health Shreveport 1904

This group photo, taken at the front entrance, shows the medical and nursing staff of the Hospital at that time. Pictured are (front row) Miss Ruth Shepard; Miss Lois Greer; and Miss Bessie Shepherd; (2nd row) Dr. A.A. Herold, Sr., an intern; Miss Calhoun; Mrs. E. McAdams; Miss T. Richardson; Miss Mary Umbehagen; and Dr. P.T. Talbot; (back row) Dr. Frank Waits; Dr. J.Q. Graves; Dr. Randell Hunt, chief surgeon; Miss Ida Perry, head nurse; Dr. R.J. Mainegra; Dr. Orrin Clark; and Mike Bernstein, a board member.

 

 

November, 2012 – Issue 13

A Move in the Right Direction

history of medicine

 

Thirty-seven years ago this December, faculty, staff, and students moved into the newly constructed medical school building. After the LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport was established in 1965, local physicians began preparing for the first class of students to start in the fall of 1969. Unfortunately, a loss of funding caused the construction of the school to be delayed. However, the Veterans Administration Hospital staff joined forces with the School of Medicine team allowing the faculty and students to use their facilities. The School of Medicine was saved, and the first class was admitted in 1969 as planned.

For the next six years, the medical school occupied space in the VA Hospital, the Confederate Memorial Medical Center, and the Linwood Apartment Complex.  Finally, after the first three classes of medical students had already graduated, the construction of the medical school building was completed, and the official campus of the LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport opened its doors. On December 15, 1975, faculty, staff, and students pitched in to move equipment, supplies, furniture and other essentials into the new facilities. With this move, the medical school offices and staff, as well as classes and instructors, were brought together for the first time under a single roof.

 

September, 2012 – Issue 12

Combining Library Instruction and History of Medicine

papyrus
Library faculty members teach a database searching class to third-year medical students during their surgery rotation. Our librarians have developed a curriculum that incorporates the history of medicine into the lesson. Students examine the Edwin Smith surgical papyrus to discover how an injury or ailment was treated in 1600 B.C. They also search current resources to report on how the same condition is treated today. Librarians Donna Timm, Dee Jones, Deidra Woodson, and John Cyrus describe this creative teaching approach in their article, “Combining History of Medicine and Library Instruction: An Innovative Approach to Teaching Database Searching to Medical Students,” which appears in the current issue of Medical Reference Services Quarterly. LSU Health Shreveport faculty members who are interested in setting up a customized library class for their students should contact Donna Timm at 318-675-5474 or e-mail dtimm@lsuhsc.edu. 

July, 2012 – Issue 11

 

July 2, 1932: O.K. Allen Tumor Clinic Opened

Tumor Clinic

The O.K. Allen Tumor Clinic

The O.K. Allen Tumor Clinic, situated in the Shreveport Charity Hospital, was the first cancer clinic in Louisiana. The Clinic, named in honor of incumbent Louisiana Governor O.K. Allen, was established under the auspices of the American College of Surgeons. The need for a cancer clinic was prompted by the increasing incidence of the disease. In the 1920s, cancer was the eighth leading cause of death and just ten years later was ranked second.

Click here for statistics from the first two years of the Clinic’s operation showing the type of cancer, condition when admitted, treatment, and final outcome.

May, 2012 – Issue 10

The First Medical School Class Graduated this Month in 1973

Dean Edgar Hull administered the Oath of Hippocrates to the 31 students who received their medical degrees on May 26, 1973. This was the first class of students admitted to the Medical School in Shreveport in September 1969. Governor Edwin W. Edwards delivered the commencement address entitled “Yours Is a Heritage of Trust.” Dr. Martin Woodin, President of the LSU System, conferred the degrees, and Dr. William H. Stewart, Chancellor of the LSU Medical Center delivered the address of welcome. Class President, George K. Harrison spoke on behalf of his fellow students. One member of this inaugural class was missing from the ceremony. Sherman Matthews died on October 25, 1972 of injuries received in a two-car accident.

March, 2012 – Issue 9

Shreveport Charity Hospital Established This Month in 1876

 

history image issue 9

Act 40, Section 1 of the legislation establishing the Shreveport Charity Hospital.

 

Act 40 of the Louisiana Legislature, signed by Governor William P. Kellogg, was passed on March 2, 1876 to establish a charity hospital in Shreveport. This hospital would be maintained at the expense of the State “for the reception and medical and surgical treatment of indigent and destitute sick and wounded persons, without distinction of race and color, said hospital to be known and designated as the ‘Shreveport Charity Hospital.’”

The Shreveport Charity Hospital was located at the site of a former private school at the corner of Pierre Avenue and Ford Street. The ill-equipped hospital, consisting of a mere group of dilapidated log and frame buildings, could accommodate only 25 patients. The first staff consisted of three professionals: Dr. Thomas G. Ford, chief surgeon; Dr. W.K. Sutherlin, intern; and Dr. W.M. Turner, superintendent. The Shreveport Charity Hospital remained at this location until 1889.

January, 2012 – Issue 8

Civil War Exhibit in Library

life and limb

More than three million soldiers fought in the Civil War from 1861-1865. More than half a million died, and almost as many were wounded but survived. Hundreds of thousands were permanently disabled by battlefield injuries or surgery, which saved lives by sacrificing limbs.

The exhibit, Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War, is now on display in the Medical Library and explores the experiences of disabled Civil War veterans and their role as symbols of the fractured nation. The perspectives of surgeons, physicians, and nurses are richly documented in the history of Civil War medicine and serve to highlight the heroism and brutality of battlefield operations, as well as the challenges of caring for the wounded during wartime.

This exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health and will be on display in the Medical Library until March 2, 2012. Additional materials pertaining to Civil War medicine, selected from the holdings of the Medical Library, are also on display. For more information please contact Dee Jones at djone4@lsuhsc.edu or 675-5458.

November, 2011 – Issue 7

LSU Health Shreveport Chosen Industry of the Year

History Corner_Issue 7On October 23, 2001, Chancellor John C. McDonald attended a special luncheon award ceremony at Harrah’s convention center. The LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport had been selected by the Greater Shreveport Chamber of Commerce as the recipient of the 2000 J. Pat Beaird Industry of the Year Award. The Health Sciences Center was honored for its community involvement and economic impact on the Shreveport area. This was the first time the award was presented to a facility other than a manufacturing industry.

September, 2011 – Issue 6

Civil War Exhibit in Library

Civil War Exhibit

Civil War Exhbit on First Floor of Library

“Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine” is currently on display in the LSU Health Shreveport Medical Library.  This exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine with research assistance from the Historical Society of Washington, D.C.  The exhibit focuses on free and enslaved African Americans who served as nurses, surgeons, and hospital workers during the Civil War.  Historical images and Civil War era documents reveal how these individuals provided medical care to soldiers and civilians while participating in the fight for freedom.  “Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries” will be on display in the library until September 24.

July, 2011 – Issue 5

A History Mystery!

Can you identity anyone in these two photos? Do you know the location or the event?

Doctors

Conference Room Image

If so, contact either Dee Jones (djone4@lsuhsc.edu) or Deidra Woodson (dwood6@lsuhsc.edu) in the Medical Library.  You can find other historical photos of LSU Health Shreveport at the LSU Health Sciences Center – Shreveport: A Chronological History, a website created by library faculty that documents the history of our institution.

April, 2011 – Issue 4

Library Featuring New Photograph Exhibit

Issue 4 History Corner

“Windows to our Past” is an exhibit that documents the history of the LSU Health Shreveport with photographs, newspaper clippings, publications, correspondence, artifacts and other primary source materials selected from the LSU Health Shreveport Archives. Beginning in 1876 with the first Shreveport Charity Hospital in downtown Shreveport, ours is a long and varied story. The exhibit highlights the various hospital and medical center locations, details the 25-year long fight to locate a medical school in Shreveport, and celebrates our founders. A special feature of the exhibit is five wooden windows, salvaged when the 1904 era Shreveport Charity Hospital was demolished in 1954. The exhibit, located in the Medical Library, is available for browsing during regular Library hours.

February, 2011 – Issue 3

History Comes to Life in the Medical Library

Med School Faculty

Part-time Medical School Faculty, 1968

In preparing for the opening of the LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport, 138 part-time faculty members were hired February 1968. On February 25th, Dean Edgar Hull announced that these dedicated professionals would volunteer their time without compensation.

Learn about this and other interesting events that occurred this month in our history in a new exhibit on display in the LSU Health Shreveport Medical Library. This exhibit will change monthly to highlight important and interesting events in our institution’s history. The display is located next to the elevators on the first floor. An online version of this exhibit is also available here through our website.

For a more comprehensive history about LSU Health Shreveport, visit LSU Health Sciences Center – Shreveport: A Chronological History, a website created by Library faculty with funds from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and the LSU Health Sciences Foundation.

In fact, a new feature has been added to the history website – videos! A number of audiovisual clips have been included to enhance the value of this resource. Watch black and white, silent footage of Governor McKeithen signing the bill to fund the medical school construction on June 7, 1966. See founding Dean Edgar Hull turn the first shovelful of earth at the School of Medicine Groundbreaking Ceremony on September 16, 1971. Hear Dr. Joe Holoubek, one of the founders of the medical school, discuss our institution’s history in a 1979 interview with Dr. Leonard Goldman. View these and many more videos at http://lsuhscshistory.org.

January, 2011 – Issue 2

1926 Fire Destroys Hospital Wing

Pictured Above: Unit 3 Ward 9 looking north as it was before the fireproofing. Dated September 28, 1927.

At 10:45 p.m. on the rainy night of March 27, 1926, a fire started when a patient carelessly discarded his cigarette in a bathroom of the Shreveport Charity Hospital. The fire quickly spread to the wards above and was discovered by a nurse, Blanche Seward, who sounded the alarm. All 220 patients were safely evacuated thanks to hospital staff and the Shreveport Fire Department. Damages to the structure were estimated at $50,000.

According to Dr. John Mosely, hospital superintendent, the fire was expected. He stated to the Shreveport Times, “This occurrence merely bears out the statement that I made on first coming to Shreveport, that the Charity Hospital is little short of a firetrap. The wooden floors and wood lathed ceilings and the fact that a great part of the interior finish is of wood, increases the danger from fire. The fact that the fire ate its way between walls all the way to the top floor proves my contention.”

The patients seemed unaffected by the fire, as evidenced by this first-hand report from a patient’s mother. “Mrs. C. B. Gough of Trout, La., who arrived at the hospital Saturday afternoon with her pretty 16-year-old daughter, Joyce Gough, for an emergency operation for gangrenous appendix, was profuse in her praise of the hospital workers who removed the girl to a comfortable bed in a front room of the hospital without even awaking her from the sleep into which she had fallen following her operation. The girl apparently was none the worse for her experience and was resting comfortably as could have been desired, according to Dr. M.S. LeDoux, operating surgeon.”

At the time of the fire, Dr. Mosely had just returned from a meeting in Baton Rouge with Governor Fuqua and members of the State Tax Commission where his pleas for additional funding for renovation and fireproofing had been positively received.

Quotes from Shreveport Times March 28, 1926.

October, 2010 – Issue 1

Did you know…

Linwood Apartment Complex

The LSU School of Medicine in Shreveport purchased the 296-unit Linwood Apartment complex located between Tulane and Cascade Streets from the Federal Housing Administration in 1967. Immediate plans were to use the apartments for the housing of students, interns, residents, and teaching staff. In 1969, seven of the buildings were renovated to house the first class of 32 medical students (from: http://lsuhscshistory.org/buildings.html). This and other facts can be found in LSUHSC-S Chronological History, a newly-created website funded by an award from the National Networks of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM).

The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center at Shreveport:  A Chronological History

HistoryHomePage_2

LSUHSC-S Chronological History (www.lsuhscshistory.org) is a website created by Medical Library faculty members. Beginning in 1869, this extensive website graphically documents more than 140 years of significant events in the history of the LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport.

Primary source materials used in the creation of this website were drawn primarily from the holdings of the Medical Library Archives and include correspondence, photographs, slides, newspaper articles, institutional publications, audio and videotapes, as well as three dimensional artifacts. Paper documents were scanned to create digital surrogates, while audiovisual materials were transferred from analog to digital format.

The decade-by-decade chronology is the foundation of the website. Brief biographies of LSUHSC-S personalities are in the “People” section; names of administrators throughout the years and short departmental histories can be found in the “Departments” section; while photographs and details about campus buildings are included in the “Buildings” section.

Specific resources used in the website include the Gordon W. Maxcy Photograph Collection; several thousand newspaper clippings dating from the early 1960s; taped oral history interviews with pioneering figures of the medical school; and videos of memorable events including Dr. Edgar Hull’s last Faculty Council Meeting as Dean and the School of Medicine groundbreaking. More than 100 cubic feet of archival resources were searched to provide a fascinating glimpse into our past. Most of the important events in our history are already documented, but the website is an evolving resource, one that will be continually updated with additional text and digitized images.

Although partial funding for the website creation has been received from the LSU Health Sciences Foundation and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region, efforts to continue the digitization of these unique and valuable resources will require additional funding.